On entering this next municipality, the coastal area features many industrial installations, including, eventually, the ecological park containing the wind turbines you may have seen whilst travelling along the TF-1 motorway. There is also the moderately-sized Montaña Roja, or “Red Mountain” and, at its foot, lie two small beaches.
Playa Pelada

This is, essentially, a small cove where a calm sea laps onto a shore of grey sand and rocks. It’s not particularly accessible.
Playa Secreta

Meaning “secret beach”, this is the only name I could find for this small inlet, flanked by rocky walls. There is a reasonable stretch of grey sand, with, typically, no people on it.
Playa del Cabezo

Due to the wind conditions and the lively sea off this beach, it has become the major centre for windsurfing and kitesurfing, hosting world championship competitions. It is also popular with surfers and, on the promenade next to it, is a water sports centre and a selection of surfing shops.
Playa La Jaquita

This is a short stretch of golden sand, very user-friendly, with the sea conditions being ideal for windsurfing.
Playa El Medano

The longest beach in Tenerife, this is very popular, yet, because of its size, never seems crowded. It is well equipped with facilities, including wheelchair access, showers and changing rooms. Despite the ever-present wind, the sea here is nice and calm, making it ideal for families.
Playa de La Tejita

A reasonably long stretch of golden sand, this beach also features a sheltered cove where naturists gather to sunbathe in the nude. Consider yourself warned! The sea here is a bit lively, so swimming may be hazardous.
Playa Leocadio Machado

This is a golden sanded, blue flag beach, with a calm, swimmer-friendly sea, despite the strong wind. It features wheelchair access, showers, changing rooms and kiosks.

Source: TIC